GUTTFULL – ‘Tits and Nails’

By Eloise Bulmer

If their EP is anything to go by, the debut full-length from dirty sax-punkers GUTTFULL is going to be a raucous and powerful release– and it doesn’t disappoint. Featuring tracks that are now classics in the band’s catalogue, they still sound fresh and piercing nestled in between songs that haven’t been heard before; making pointed observations and witty remarks on our society and the kind of people you’re likely to meet whilst navigating it.

An early highlight ‘Does Your Girlfriend Know You’re Here?’ shows off the best of vocalist Momoe’s signature sarcastic tone– you can almost hear the eye rolls in her voice as she lists off the reasons she’s suspicious that the man she’s seeing has a girlfriend. It’s one of the things GUTTFULL do seriously well– being so specific in their story-telling that you can’t help but feel like you’re there with them. On the track ‘Messy’, which is a real life account of domestic violence, Momoe tells us about being at a New Years party with someone who won’t stop saying to her “I know you’re fucking him.” These lyrics are sung over an ominous drum beat that propels the story forward to the inevitable explosion of a chorus, with a cacophony of wailing saxophone and guitar joining the ensemble as Momoe shouts that “you pushed me, I pushed you fucking harder,” proving that this band can write about difficult topics and make it impossible to not be on their side. On the flip side, this is also a band that knows how to best find the ridiculousness of occurrences that a lot of women will be familiar with. ‘That’s What He Says’ tells the story of going to your local fast food place to get some “coke, chips and a burger”– then a male onlooker calls you “greedy”. It’s so specific, yet so relatable– and the chorus claps make it one of the catchiest on the album.

You’d be forgiven for thinking this is a band that only has one mode: fast-paced and pissed off. It’s a pleasant surprise then, that upon reaching the final track ‘White Man’s Had His Day’, the lead vocal is supported by dreamy harmonies from guitarist Cassie and bassist Gemma. It shows another side to the band, but a side that has something equally important to say, with the lyrics “the white man’s had his day, just look at the mess he’s made, now it’s time for a change of play” ringing especially poignant amongst the current stories in the news.

If you’re looking for an album to lift your spirits in a time of political uncertainty and sadness, give this a listen. It’s not an album to turn to for escapism, rather one to put on when you need to remember that there are people out there fighting the same fight–and have a dance whilst doing so.

ELOISE BULMER

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